Monthly Feature 14: Is there problem in the world?

“The world does not seem to have any real problem.”
I read the comment as I was listening to a song on YouTube.

The song composed by A.R. Rahman was sung by students of Berkelee College of Music who belonged to different nationalities, religions and ethnicities. Yet they sang an Islamic devotional song together that has touched the hearts of thousands of people.

Each of us is different from the other. We should not be scared by the differences between us. Captain Paul says:

We must respect the differences we have. We must also be able to know that despite our differences, we have some similarities.

What really do we have in common? A lot. You just need to observe them carefully. One thing that I would like to discuss here, however is that we all want peace. Music is one form of art that has bound us since the beginning of time.

I love listening to songs of different religions. They have beautiful, meaningful words and soothing music (even if I don’t understand word.) They touch my soul. I feel my connection with the Being Supreme- the caretaker of all souls.

I have sung and listened Bhajans (Hindu devotional songs), I have listened (and cried with joy) listening to Buddhist hymns and Islam Sufis. These songs have taught me a lot of things: human culture, life and above all, humanity.

No song has taught me to disregard the Supreme Being. (Some pray Bhagwan, some Ram, some Krishna, some Buddha, some Allah, and some Khuda.) No song has taught me to kill others for fun. No song has taught me to cheat people. I have always learnt to be good to everyone and everything around me.

So, why are there disputes in the names of religions? All the religions in the world show path to the same Supreme Being called by different names. I intend to share a few other songs on YouTube that have touched my soul.

  1. Zariya – AR Rahman, Ani Choying, Farah Siraj – Coke Studio
  2. Phoolko aakhama by Ani Choying Dolma
  3. Bhagwan Timro – Ani Choying Dolma
  4. Tri Ratna

On this day of Saraswati Pooja–the day of the Hindu Goddess of knowledge, wisdom, art and music– I pray that our knowledge defeat the darkness of ignorance.

Monthly Feature 13: Some Nepali Folk Songs

On this first Monthly Feature (first post as well) of 2017, I’m going to share some of the songs I heard during my stay at Palpa.

The first song I share is a typical Folk song of the Mid- and Far-Western Region called Deuda. There are a lot of songs within the Deuda culture, Raijhuma is the most popular. I’m not going to tell why it is popular among the mass; just a reason why it got famous in our camp.

One of the students in the camp, Tej Bahadur Rokaya (Tej dai-because he is much senior by age) hailed from Karnali.

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Tej dai sings on the last day of the camp

Within some days we discovered that he can sing Raijhuma of his own using his quick wits.Soon the whole camp was singing and enjoying the song. Here’s a version of the song on YouTube.

The second song is related to the Rodi culture of the Western Nepal with a modern touch. This songs tells the features of Rodi popular among the indigenous communities like Gurung, Magar, etc. I heard this song for the first time through Anil Regmi. I found two versions of this song on YouTube: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=zp8n38kx7Ow and https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=EPzM92gZMO4

The other song that I remember is Jhamke Guleli. I had heard this song being sung by boys last year at Malekhu but I had not understood it then. This song is a simple one with deep sorrow expressed in beautiful words. Here’s a link of the song on YouTube: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Q8f0EL6u99o

The fourth song I am sharing is Kaanchhiko chhata dhalkai deu yeta by Tulsi Parajuli. This is beautiful Folk song of love with its origin in the Eastern region. While listening to the Folk songs from the Western Region on a regular basis, my mind wanted to switch to the Eastern Region. That’s why I downloaded and listened to this song. The YouTube link: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ASIaCFl3NfA

That’s it for this month. May our lives be filled with music this year!

Monthly Feature 12: Let’s take a “Breathless” Revision

When I began writing posts under the category of “Monthly Feature” at the beginning of this year, the only thing I aimed was consistency. The other aim was to review music, movies and art. As I look back, I realize that there have been movie reviews have become more numerous than the others. On the twelfth monthly feature–the last for the year 2016, let’s take a revision.

On January, I featured a Nepali folk music band: Night. Despite being named Night, I discussed how the band is taking Nepali music on to the light. The second post was the review of a wonderful Nepali movie Jhola. On the third monthly feature that came on March, I could not find a specific topic, I guess. So I discussed how our very existence could be an art and how we can indulge ourselves in art as well.

I went to a wood-art exhibition in March. Later, it turned into April’s monthly feature. I was really mesmerized by the way, artists from various parts of the world to create the best they could. May’s featured post offered condolences to Thinle, the hero of Dolpa whose movie Himalaya (aka Caravan) was nominated in the Academy Awards. In June, I analyzed Maleficent (2014) and discussed if it is fair to call her a villain.

In mid-June, I watched Kalo Pothi, a movie based on lives of Karnali. I reviewed its pros and cons in July. For August, I seem to have lost a specific topic again. So, I shared some songs and music I was listening that month. They were only a little part of the music I listened to, however.

The last three monthly features have been movie reviews. In September, Inside Out was reviewed, and Interstellar in October. The last post was on Pashupati Prasad, one of the finest movies that have been made in Nepal.

 Just before I wrap up, I would like to share a song–Breathless by Shankar Mahadevan. Most people are amazed by the way he sings; but to me what he sings strikes a chord deep within me.

 

Monthly Feature 8: Songs I’m Listening this Monsoon

August’s Monthly Feature is about some songs I am listening this monsoon. There are hundreds of songs I listen to. The songs here are just representative of their types.



First, Songs on Monsoon

Asarai Mahinama: There are several cover versions of this song, which I heard before the original. This original song sung by Chujan Dukpa beautifully tells the story of a man who is remembering his family from abroad.

Basai Bagayo: Aka Koshi, this is a beautiful song which carries the story of people affected the Koshi flooding about eight years ago. The song is significant even today as Koshi is shifting westwards from its previous bank and has been troubling many people who depend upon it.
Next, Love Songs

Tiriri Murali Banyo Banaima: This song, originally sung by Panna Kaji (The link leads to the version later sung by his son, Pravesh Man Shakya.) is a beautiful reminiscence of love.

Ek Ladki Ko: All time favorite of mine, this Hindi song is penned by Javed Akhtar, composed by R.D. Burman and sung by Kumar Sanu. I particularly love the lyrics of this song.
And finally, sentimental melodies

Kabhi Alvida Naa Kehna: Titular song of the Bollywood movie Kabhi Alvida Naa Kehna translates into Never Say Goodbye. When I say goodbye to someone, maybe they don’t want me to go away.

Yo Dajuko Mirmire Aankha: This tragic folk song is about a couple about to be separated due to financial problems.